Flying Jakob – Swedish cult curry

Flygande Jakob

Flygande Jakob (flying Jakob) is a modern Swedish classic, invented in the 70s by an airline freight man called Arne. I love its savoury weirdness, as it mixes whipped cream, ketchup, curry and banana. The original includes chicken and bacon, but I enjoy this one with quorn. In trying to become a half-veggie, recipes such as these are a good way of substituting chicken, telling no substantial difference whatsoever.

I tend to be skeptical of meat imitations, because vegetarian food holds it own very well without copying meat, and also because imitations rarely taste as good as the real thing. But this tastes marvellous, and I over-binge every time we make this at home.

Cream and ketchup

For four portions, you need:

  • 2 bags of defrosted quorn (or 500 grams of chicken)
  • Bacon (optional, for the meaties)
  • 4 dl cream
  • 1 tsp mild madras curry powder
  • 1 1/2 dl ketchup
  • 2 bananas
  • 2 handfuls peanuts or cashewnuts
  • Basmati rice and sriracha sauce to serve

Quorn, banana, and cream mix

Start by frying the quorn pieces in a little bit of the curry powder and oil. Once they’ve taken on some colour, let them cool while you whip the cream. Mix the ketchup into the the cream, and add the rest of the curry powder. Cut the banana up in fat, coin-sized pieces, and scatter it with the quorn in an oven-proof pan. Distribute the whipped cream evenly on top, and let it sit in the oven at 200 degrees for about 20 minutes, or until it has  browned on top. About five minutes before you think it’s ready, scatter the nuts on top, and put it back into the oven.

Flygande Jakob out of the oven.

Take it out and let cool slightly while you prepare a cold beer and set the table. Serve it with basmati rice, and some sriracha chili sauce on top for those who want to some heat with the savoury sweetness. Needless to say, this really does taste better the day after, and makes for a perfect lunchbox. We’ve tried making it healthier by substituting cream with Turkish yoghurt, but I would not recommend it.


Lunchbox extravaganza pt. 4: Wasabi and crabstick wrap

Crabstick is one of those ingredients I’ve always been a bit sceptical to, but still eaten in great amounts. I don’t really want to think much about what goes in them, so I won’t elaborate more on it here. What is clear is that they are a cheap, easy and tasty way of getting a bit of omega 3 in your diet, and I quite like their sweet, mild flavour. Since they are cooked they are also safe for sandwiches. What’s more, when they are mixed into a wrap together with a dollop of creme fraiche, some wasabi, peanuts, avocado, coriander and cucumber, topped off with crispy lettuce, they become like a hybrid sushi/Skagen sandwich, and are delicious. Also very healthy. So for my latest lunchbox revelation, you’ll need:

  • Crabstick (around 8 should suffice)
  • 1 dollop Creme fraiche
  • Fresh, chopped coriander
  • Cucumber, cut into long strips
  • Lettuce
  • Avocado, sliced
  • Wasabi paste (to taste)
  • Lemon or lime juice
  • Salt and pepper
  • Wraps
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Start by cutting the crabstick into thin slices. This is easily done by pressing each stick between your fingers, and then pulling them apart one by one. Put into a bowl, and mix together with the avocado, creme fraiche, wasabi (but be careful and don’t add too much!), lemon juice and cucumber. When mixed, put a large tablespoon onto a wrap, top off with crushed peanuts, some lettuce and cucumber, a bit of salt and pepper, and an extra squirt lime/lemon juice. Fold tightly together like an envelope roll, and place in a well-sealed food container which will hold it in place until you need to eat it. If it is hot and your avocado is on the brink of over-maturing, don’t let the wrap sit in your bag and wait all day, for it can become a bit funny in the sun. Else you will have a filling and tasty treat waiting for you.
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